Regular care, the best prevention

 
 
 

In the United States, more than one in ten babies are born too early every year. Preterm birth (or premature birth) is the birth of an infant before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Depending on gestational age, it can be extremely preterm (less than 28 weeks), very preterm (from 28 to less than 32 weeks), and moderate preterm (from 32 to less than 37 weeks). Many organ (including the brain, lungs, and liver) need the final weeks of pregnancy to fully develop; thus, a baby born too early may have breathing problems, feeding difficulties, and vision and hearing problems, among others. Although the causes of preterm births are numerous (multiple pregnancies, infections, diabetes, and high blood pressure), women can reduce their risk of preterm birth improving caring for their health before, between and during pregnancies.

It has been shown that supplementation with EPA and DHA, both omega-3 fatty acids, is effective in preventing preterm delivery. This is an easy and safe preventive measure. And it is important to remember that care should not be limited to prenatal period: any woman of childbearing age should usually take care about her health in order to improve the development of a possible pregnancy.

 

Bibliography

 
 

Delaying ovarian aging

In animal models, higher dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids extend reproductive lifespan. In women with normal weight (but not in obese women) with normal ovarian reserve,[...]