Omega-3, mammographic density and breast cancer risk II

 
 
 

There are many risk factors for breast cancer, some of them can be avoided (smoking, for example), but many cannot (being a woman, aging, genetics risk factors, breast density, and family and personal history of breast cancer). Anything that increases the chance of developing cancer is called a cancer risk factor; anything that decreases the chance of developing cancer is called a cancer protective factor.

Breast density is a cancer risk factor (as we explained in our previous post). Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors for some types of cancer.

To identify the link between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids intake and mammographic density, a group of Canadian researchers consucted a study amongst 777 premenopausal and 783 postmenopausal women. They didn’t find any relationship between omega-6 fatty acids intake and mammographic density, but higher omega-3 intake was associated with lower mammographic density. This finding suggests that increased omega-3 fatty acids intake could be useful for breast cancer prevention.

 

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